Recent changes on the Turn Watcher website

This page includes all the recent changes of the Turn Watcher website. If you cannot find what you are looking for, try the menus or the Site Index.

Initiative in Dungeons & Dragons 3e and 3.5e (and Pathfinder)

Introduction

The first version of Dungeons & Dragons created by Wizards of the Coast after they purchased Tactical Studies Rules (TSR) on April 10, 1997, 18 years after Gagy Gygax left the company. TSR was failing financially at the time.

TSR was the company that Gary Gygax and his friend Don Kaye founded in 1973. The company produced Chainmail, a wargame, and The Strategic Review, which ...

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Initiative and Bonuses, an important aspect of combat

Original Version (1974)

In the very version of Dungeons & Dragons (1974), initiative would be rolled with 1d6 and you would add your Dexterity bonus which was limited to +1 when you had an ability score of 13 or more. There is the Dexterity bonus table:

Dexterity
Score
Missile
to Hit
Bonus
3-8 -1
...

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Documentation Gallery

The following are the screenshots and other images used in the Turn Watcher™ documentation.

Click on the images to enlarge them.

 

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Rogue Initiative in 5e

In Dungeons & Dragons version 5e, the Rogue obtains a new feat when reaching level 17 called Thief's Reflexes.

D&D Player's Handbook Cover picture--a female magicien is casting a spell against a fire giant; giant which takes most of the space on the coverThis feat gives the Rogue the equivalent of two full turns on the first round.

This means the Rogue is able to have two full actions, bonus actions, movements, etc. within the first round.

If you have a Rogue that can cast spells, that's where you would be able to use ...

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AFK The Webseries: Awakening

This is a mini webseries posted on YouTube.

If you have not yet seen the episodes I and II posted in 2015, then please go check that video first. It's here: AFK: The Webseries. The Awakenings videos are happening more or less along the episodes I, II, and III.

The storyline is a set of people playing a video game in a world similar to Dungeons & Dragons get sucked in the game and they ...

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Initiative in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2e

Introduction

The Combat sequence in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons version 2e was very much streamlined compared to the previous two versions.

First of all, the new designers, led by David Zeb Cook, introduced a clear definition of what an Action is, with a list of things that you can accomplish during a combat round, such as an attack or casting a spell. They also introduced a small list of ...

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Initiative in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (a.k.a. 1e)

Introduction

Gary Gygax reorganized and enhanced the first version of Dungeons & Dragons of 1974 and published three new books: the Monster Manual (1977), the Player's Handbook (1978), and the Dungeons Master's Guide (1979). Later, more would come out such as Arcana (1985) and Oriential Adventures (1985).

Notice how they first published the Monster Manual that could be used with ...

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Initiative in Dungeons & Dragons Basic Box Set

Introduction

A Book Cover of the very first Dungeons & Dragons Box SetGary Gygax and Dave Arneson published 1,000 copies that they printed themselves, of their new game: Dungeons & Dragons.

 

This very first version had good success and was quickly followed by more by the same authors.

Surprise Round

This version had a surprise round that did not involve any initiative. If the Monster or the Party could surprise their opponent, then ...

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Dungeons & Dragons: Initiative Handling on a per Version Basis

The following is a list of pages that describe how the handling of the initiative has changed over the ages.

As a brief history, it went from a d6 rolled by each character and monster and a possible +1 or -1 Dexterity adjustments, to a 1d6 without adjustments, to a d10 and many  in AD&D 2e, to a d20 when Wizard of the Coast bought TSR and created D&D 3e.

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