Blogs

Hit Points, Temporary Hit Points, Bleeding, Death in Dungeons & Dragons

Dungeons & Dragons makes use of hit points to represent the health of a creature. Player characters gain additional hit points as they increase their character levels. The number of hit points varies depending on the character class.

Note that monsters can also be given more or less hit points depending on the situation. As a Dungeon Master you can also "auto-kill" a monster when it gets hit. I have done that once in a while. You just don't want to kill all your player characters. It's just not fun (although once in a while it can happen...)

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AFK: Vanya's Camp

I'm getting ahead of myself here, this is Vany's Camp and I do not yet know what it is about. Need to watch it. I'll update this once that's done so you have a better idea where you put your feet.

These came out in 2017.

 

Note that these episodes are really short! (about 2 minutes each).

 

AFK: Vanya's Camp - Epic Drop (Jun 15, 2017)

 

AFK: Vanya's ...

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AFK The Webseries: Awakening

This is a mini webseries posted on YouTube.

If you have not yet seen the episodes I and II posted in 2015, then please go check that video first. It's here: AFK: The Webseries. The Awakenings videos are happening more or less along the episodes I, II, and III.

The storyline is a set of people playing a video game in a world similar to Dungeons & Dragons get sucked in the game and they ...

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AFK: The Webseries

There is this mini series, call AFK: Webseries, that came out on Nov 15, 2015. The story: A bunch of computer RPG (Role Playing Game) players get sucked in the fantasy world they are playing that night. The series starts with each one awakening as their characters. They have a headacke which disappear fairly quickly and then realize that they are their character...

Note for those who don't ...

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How are dice being used in Dungeons & Dragons

Introduction

Today, Dungeons & Dragons are rule books. However, to a minimum, if you actually want to play D&D, you need to get a set of dice. One set is 7 dice of various sizes as described in detail here.

These sizes are:

  • 1d4
  • 1d6
  • 1d8
  • 1d10 (x2)
  • 1d12
  • 1d20

Today, a set generally includes two 1d10 dice. One for the units and one for the tenth. ...

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How do you choose your dice for Dungeons and Dragons games?

Type of Dices in Dungeons and Dragons

Since 1974, Dungeons and Dragons, and many other Role Playing and other games since then, adopted a set of 5 dice. These included:

  • 4 sided die (1d4)
  • 6 sided die (1d6)
  • 8 sided die (1d8)
  • 12 sided die (1d12)
  • 20 sided die (1d20)

The game uses the various dice to spice the play role gaming with varying randomness.

For ...

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Turn Watcher 2.0 — A Status Update

Okay, so another update on the plight of my brainchild, Turn Watcher, version 2.0. With the conversion to wxWidgets, I find I am staring at a nasty bug deep within the wxWidgets code that I am having a tough time overcoming, and that is putting the project on hold until I can figure out how to fix it. Apparently it was patched and somehow cropped back up again.

In that spirit, I have decided ...

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Turn Watcher Version 2.0–What’s the Hold-up?!

 

About six months ago (or has it been longer? I dunno–time flies when you’re having fun!) I finally decided I’d had enough of Gtkmm and Gtk+. I had been working to port our D&D initiative tracking (and more!) application Turn Watcher to Mac OS/X. And I had been spending quite a lot of time on it too. But everything I did resulted in undefined behavior and crashes when ...

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